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Yoni Ki Baat

Embracing Identity through Performance.

Krithi Vachaspati, Photo Staff

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Every year, the South Asian Students Association (SASA) organizes an event based on the monologues from “Yoni Ki Baat,” written and produced in 2003 by the South Asian Sisters in San Francisco. Students perform both original pieces and pieces provided by the South Asian Sisters.

 

The performance took place in The Grind last Friday, as students gathered to support their friends and classmates in an important evening for SASA.  

 

Yoni Ki Baat consisted of one long night of stories, while last year, it was spread out through the weekend because of the large volume of original pieces.

 

The originally written and performed pieces were some of the most powerful, especially one performed by Jurry Bajwa (‘20) about his role as a brother protecting his sister when she leaves the house. He explained that telling her to cover up is not out of his own beliefs, but out of fear for her safety. Another very powerful piece was performed by Padmini Dey (‘19) about her experience dealing with the “Fair and Lovely” beauty standard, and eventually coming to terms with the beauty of her dark-skinned complexion.

 

SASA member, Tenzing Ngodup Gurung (‘19) performed an original piece titled “Chowpati,” which was told in the man’s perspective, involving the traditional practice of sending women to menstrual huts. The piece spoke to how much pain a man can feel for a woman, even though he himself will never have that experience.

 

Meyru Bhanti (‘18), who performed a piece with Ariana Meraj (‘18), shared her thoughts on the value of the experience to her and the Clark community.

 

“YKB is my favorite event of the year because we have the chance to cultivate a show that  speaks to a lot of underrepresented struggles within South Asia,” said Bhanti.  

 

“I wanted to perform because I feel like there is a growing number of people with non- monoracial identities, and through art and performance we can provide support for each other.”
“I was really proud of the number of Clarkie-written speeches we got this year and hope that can continue.”

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